Regency tales

adventure, intrigue and romance in Regency times

                                        THE  CITIES                                                

                                            LONDON   

         In The Wild Card, when Kitty goes to London, she stays with her rich great-aunt in Grosvenor Square. Then, as now, it was a very fashionable place to live. The buildings were five stories high, including basement and attic, all built on a grand scale.  In the centre of the square was a garden for the residents to enjoy and providing somewhere for the children to play outside.

                   

           It took Kitty and her maid, Martha, less than half an hour to walk from this elegant setting into the St Giles Rookery, situated close to The Haymarket. It was a teeming slum, overrun with hopelessly poor people as well as criminals and prostitutes. Kitty dreams of improving conditions there but Theo knows better.  

         By 1810 London had a range of buildings in the neo-classical style, creating an impression of refined elegance, due to their clean lines and harmony of structure, as in Regent's Park Terrace.  Bond Street was the favoured shopping street for wealthy and fashionable people. In addition to its milliners, dress shops and jewellers, there were sporting venues for energetic gentlemen, such as Gentleman Jackson's Boxing Saloon at No 13,

 

                  

                  and next door to that, Angelo's Fencing Academy. 

                

                    Mr H Angelos Fencing Academy, engraved by Charles Rosenberg, 1791 - (after) Rowlandson, Thomas

 This is where Greg spends some hours trying to forget his sorrows in bout after bout of épée practice.

  

                                               BATH 

          Bath was an elegant Georgian city, with an unusual degree of harmony in its architecture. The warm, honey coloured local stone added an extra charm to the appearance of the buildings. Here is the magnificent sweep of the Royal Crescent displaying the grand, unified frontage typical of neo-classical design. The backs of these buildings, however, varied considerably.

 

             

 

     Sarah, the heroine of In All Honour, knows Bath well and enjoys staying there - until she finds that her unwanted admirer has arrived in town!   

     Lord Percival is accustomed to living in luxury

so he takes a house in The Circus, a most

exclusive part of Bath.  However, Greg,

 intent on discovering whether Lord Percival

is a crook, soon discovers his address and

keeps watch on him.

 

 

 

 

                                      BRIGHTON 

 

          It was fashionable to spend a few weeks at the seaside during the summer months. Ramsgate was popular during the time of George III but the Prince Regent favoured Brighton and soon most wealthy members of the ton flocked there. His unique creation, the Royal Pavilion, an exotic mix of various oriental styles, shows the tendency to excess that existed in this period. 

                           

 

        Sea bathing was supposed to improve health, especially in winter. Ladies could bathe from the safety of a cabin drawn into the water by a horse, under the supervision of a local woman. But....  while the ladies bathed, the less scrupulous gentlemen would watch through spy-glasses from the upper windows of their smart lodging houses along the sea front.

      Anna, in The Rake's Challenge, is determined to try sea bathing but she ends up in hot water with Giles.

                                             Sea bathing